English Language Arts

English 9                                

Students continue to build on the reading and writing strategies developed through Language Arts.  A variety of both fiction and non-fiction are used.  Students have more responsibility for interpreting and responding to what they read; materials become increasingly complex.  Formal writing situations, especially the essay, become the norm.  Students should be able to compose full sentences and paragraphs and to proofread for awkward writing.  The careful use of language for effect and the use of more sophisticated vocabulary is a primary goal.

 

English 10 Composition (2 Credits)

Prerequisite: English 9.

Students must take 2 of the 6 English 10 options to gain English 10 credit. 

Composition 10 is designed to support students in their development of written communication. Students will read and study compositions by other writers and consider a variety of styles as models for the development of their writing. The course builds students’ writing competencies by introducing them to varied structures, forms, and styles of composition such as narrative, expository, descriptive, persuasive, and/or opinion pieces.  While creative writing and oral language will be explored, the main focus of the course will be planning, drafting, editing, and writing for specific audiences and purposes.

 

English 10 Literature Studies (2 Credits)                  

Prerequisite: English 9.

Students must take 2 of the 6 English 10 options to gain English 10 credit.

Literary Studies 10 is designed for students who are interested in literature in the forms of poetry, short stories, novels, drama, graphic novels, children’s literature, Canadian literature, First Peoples’ texts, thematic studies and/or specific author studies.   Students will explore a range of literary topics to increase their literacy skills, enhance their understanding of the English language, to expand their development as educated global citizens, to develop balance and broaden their understanding of themselves and the world and to develop higher-level thinking and learning skills. Creative writing and oral language will also be explored.

 

English 10 New Media (2 Credits)                               

Prerequisite English 9.

Students must take 2 of the 6 English 10 options to gain English 10 credit.

New Media 10 is a program of studies designed to reflect the changing role of technology in today’s society and the increasing importance of digital media in communicating and exchanging ideas. New Media 10 recognizes that digital literacy is an essential characteristic of the educated citizen. Coursework is aimed at providing students with a set of skills vital for success in an increasingly complex digital world by affording opportunities to demonstrate understanding and communicate ideas through a variety of digital and print media.   The course provides students opportunities to build and experiment with their written and spoken language skills through the writing and design process to create original pieces, and express themselves creatively in a variety of genres.  This will involve the study of both written and oral forms of communication.  The focus of the course is on Media and film studies, Journalism and publishing, and Digital communication.

 

English First Peoples 10 Writing (2 Credits)                         

Prerequisite English 9.

Students must take 2 of the 6 English 10 options to gain English 10 credit.

EFP Writing 10 is designed for students who are interested in writing for a variety of purposes and contexts. This area of choice provides students with opportunities to become better writers through the exploration of personal and cultural identities, memories, stories, and connections to land/place. Within a supportive community, students will work individually and collaboratively to develop their writing skills and create coherent, purposeful, and engaging compositions. This course is grounded in the exploration and application of writing processes, inviting students to express themselves as they experiment with, reflect on, extend, and refine their writing. The focus is on community-focused text, writing for advocacy, writing for expression, exploration of First Peoples themes, writing to challenge non-Indigenous historical narratives, engaging in First Nations language revitalization projects, Publishing process and industry, and Advertising writing.

 

English First Peoples 10 Literature studies (2 Credits)        

Prerequisite English 9.

Students must take 2 of the 6 English 10 options to gain English 10 credit.

EFP Literary Studies 10 is designed for students who are interested in exploring First Peoples’ literature in a variety of contexts, genres, and media. This area of choice provides students with opportunities to explore personal and cultural identities, histories, stories, and connections to land/place. This course is grounded in the understanding of how texts are historically and culturally constructed. Students will work individually and collaboratively to broaden their understanding of themselves and the world.   The focus of the course is on thematic study of First Peoples literature, locally developed First Peoples’ texts, Specific First Nations, Métis, or Inuit author study, First Peoples’ children’s literature, and Storytelling in a First Peoples’ context.

 

English First Peoples 10-New Media (2 Credits)                  

Prerequisite English 9.

Students must take 2 of the 6 English 10 options to gain English 10 credit.

EFP New Media 10 is designed for students who are interested in exploring the increasing importance of digital media in communicating and exchanging ideas. This area of choice provides students with opportunities to think about the use of new media and its effects on individuals and on First Peoples’ communities and cultures. Students will work individually and collaboratively to develop skills needed in an increasingly complex digital world as they demonstrate understanding and communicate ideas through a variety of digital and print media.  The course provides students opportunities to build and experiment with their written and spoken language skills through the writing and design process to create original pieces, and express themselves creatively in a variety of genres.  This will involve the study of both written and oral forms of communication.  The focus is on Media and film studies related to First Peoples’ themes, Journalism & publishing related to First Peoples’ themes and Digital communication related to First Peoples’ themes.

 

 

English 11: Literary Studies

Literary Studies 11 allows students to delve deeply into literature. Students can explore specific themes, periods, authors, or areas of the world through literary works (fiction and non-fiction) in a variety of media. Students will work on literacy skills, English Language Arts core competencies, and developing higher-level thinking and learning skills to balance and broaden their understanding of themselves and the world, as well as to expand their development as educated global citizens,. Possible areas focus include canonical literature by era (Middle Ages, Renaissance, Restoration, Romantic, Victorian, 20th century), genre-specific studies (poetry, short stories, novels, drama, graphic novels, children’s literature), world literature, diasporic literature, feminist literature, Canadian literature, First Peoples texts, specific author studies, specific topic, theme, or inquiry and literature by era (Middle Ages, Renaissance, Restoration, Romantic, Victorian, 20th century).

 

English 11: Composition

Composition 11 is designed to support students as they refine, clarify, and adjust their written communication through practice and revision. Students will read and study compositions by other writers and be exposed to a variety of styles as models for the development of their writing. The course provides opportunities for students to, with increasing independence, study, create, and write original and authentic pieces for a range of purposes and real-world audiences. They will expand their competencies through processes of drafting, reflecting, and revising to build a body of work that demonstrates expanding breadth, depth, and evidence of writing for a range of situations. They will develop confidence in their abilities as they consolidate their writing craft. Possible areas of study include narrative, expository, descriptive, persuasive and opinion pieces, as well as writing for specific audiences/disciplines, proper citation and vetting sources of information for quality and reliability.

EFP 11: Literary Studies + Writing

This course is designed for students who are interested in studying First Peoples literature and using writing for self-expression and communication in a variety of contexts. Students delve deeply into First Peoples oral and written literature in a range of media to explore various themes, authors, and topics. This provides a foundation for them to think critically and creatively as they continue to explore, extend, and strengthen their own writing. Within a supportive community, students work individually and collaboratively to explore oral and written literature and create powerful, purposeful compositions. Through their work in the course they will deepen their understanding of themselves and the world, and expand their understanding of what it means to be educated Canadian and global citizens.  Possible areas of study include community focused text, personal and cultural identity, exploration of First Nations themes, performance art, academic, technical and professional composition and intersections between First Peoples themes and other social justice issues.

EFP 11: Literary Studies + New Media

This course is designed for students who are interested in studying First Peoples literature and examining the evolving role of technology in today’s society, especially the increasing importance of digital media in communicating and exchanging ideas and engaging in social advocacy. Students delve deeply into First Peoples oral and written literature in a range of media to explore various themes, authors, and topics.
This provides a foundation for students to think critically and creatively as they continue to explore, extend, and strengthen their own writing and communication. Students examine the increasingly complex digital world and have opportunities to demonstrate understanding and communicate sophisticated ideas through a wide variety of digital and print media. . Through their work in the course they will deepen their understanding of themselves and the world, and expand their understanding of what it means to be educated Canadian and global citizens.  The possible areas of focus are the influence of new media on First Peoples personal/cultural identities, exploration of First Peoples themes as represented in new media, new media performance art, intersections between first peoples themes and online social advocacy, media studies related to First Peoples themes, journalism and publishing related to First Peoples themes, and digital communication related to First Peoples Themes.

English 12

English 12 course builds on and extends students’ previous learning experiences in ELA and EFP 10 and 11 courses. It is designed for all students and provides them with opportunities to:

 

  • refine their ability to communicate effectively in a variety of contexts and to achieve their personal and career goals
  • think critically and creatively about the uses of language
  • explore texts from a variety of sources, in multiple modes, and that reflect diverse worldviews
  • deepen their understanding of themselves and others in a changing world
  • gain insight into the diverse factors that shape identity
  • appreciate the importance of self-representation through text
  • contribute to Reconciliation by building greater understanding of the knowledge and perspectives of First Peoples
  • expand their understanding of what it means to be educated Canadian and global citizens

 

English First Peoples 12

EFP 12 builds upon and extends students’ previous learning experiences in ELA and EFP 10 and 11 courses. The course is grounded in the First Peoples Principles of Learning. It is designed for all students, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, who are interested in delving deeply into First Peoples oral and written literature and visual texts in a range of media. The course focuses on the experiences, values, beliefs, and lived realities of First Peoples as evidenced in various forms of text, including oral story, poetry, song, performance, film, and prose. A key feature of the course is its focus on authentic First Peoples voices (i.e., historical or contemporary texts created by or with First Peoples). In EFP 12, all students:

  • examine texts grounded in a diversity of First Peoples cultures, including local First Nations or Métis communities
  • extend their capacity to communicate effectively in a variety of contexts
  • think critically and creatively about the uses of language
  • deepen their understanding of themselves and others in a changing world
  • gain insight into the diverse factors that have shaped and continue to shape their own identities
  • appreciate the importance of self-representation through authentic First Peoples text
  • contribute to Reconciliation by building greater understanding of the knowledge and perspectives of First Peoples
  • expand their understandings of what it means to be educated Canadian and global citizens

 

Literary Studies 12 (4 credits)

This course is an elective, this cannot be used as the required English course for graduation

Literary Studies 12 allows students to delve more deeply into literature through increasingly complex texts. Students can explore specific themes, periods, authors, or areas of the world through literary works (fiction and non-fiction) in a variety of media. Giving students the choice of a range of literary topics allows them to follow their passion and at the same time.  Possible areas of focus include genre-specific studies – poetry, short stories, novels, drama, graphic novels, children’s literature, world literature, diasporic literature, feminist literature, Canadian literature, First Peoples texts, specific author studies, topic, theme, or inquiry and canonical literature by era—Middle Ages, Renaissance, Restoration, Romantic, Victorian, 20th century

 

Film Studies 12A: Early Hollywood & Foreign Film Classics (2 credits)

Prerequisite: English 10 or English 10 First Peoples

This course is open to grade 11 and 12 students only.

Film Studies begins with early silent films in the 1930s and black & white films from the 1940’s and 1950’s moving on to colour films in the 1950s until 1970. Students will learn to write about the plots, characters, symbols, themes as well as techniques and styles in film.  Films from different countries and different genres will be watched. Students will discuss and explore techniques, meaning and the impact of films. Students will also write about film and work on film projects.  Film Studies A covers early film, Hollywood, and foreign films from 1930 -1970.

 

Film Studies 12B: Film After 1970 (2 credits)

Prerequisite: The successful completion of a language arts 10 course.

This course is open to grade 11 and 12 students only. 

Film 12B covers Hollywood films, foreign films and animated film from 1970 – present.